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Borderline Personality Treatment
Treatment Plan 

Borderline 
Personality 
Disorder
Treatment Plan 

Borderline 
Personality 
Disorder
Definition

SNOMED Terms

  • Atypical depressive disorder

  • Bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive

  • Borderline personality disorder

  • Chronic bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive

  • Depressive disorder

  • Mild bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive

  • Mixed anxiety and depressive disorder

  • Moderate bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive

  • No diagnosis on Axis I

  • Person with feared complaint, no diagnosis made

  • Severe bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive with psychotic features

  • Severe bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive without psychotic features

  • Severe bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive, in partial remission

  • Severe bipolar II disorder, most recent episode major depressive, in remission

  • Single major depressive episode, severe, with psychosis

Goals

  • Develop and demonstrate coping skills to deal with mood swings.

  • Develop the ability to control impulsive behavior.

  • Replace dichotomous thinking with the ability to tolerate ambiguity and complexity in people and issues.

  • Develop and demonstrate anger management skills.

  • Learn and practice interpersonal relationship skills.

  • Terminate self-damaging behaviors (such as substance abuse, reckless driving, sexual acting out, binge eating, or suicidal behaviors).

Behavioral Definitions

  • A minor stress leads to extreme emotional reactivity (anger, anxiety, or depression) that usually lasts from a few hours to a few days.

  • A pattern of intense, chaotic interpersonal relationships.

  • Marked identity disturbance.

  • Impulsive behaviors that are potentially self-damaging.

  • Recurrent suicidal gestures, threats, or self-mutilating behavior.

  • Chronic feelings of emptiness and boredom.

  • Frequent eruptions of intense, inappropriate anger.

  • Easily feels unfairly treated and believes that others can't be trusted.

  • Analyzes most issues in simple terms (e.g., right/wrong, black/white, trustworthy/deceitful) without regard for extenuating circumstances or complex situations.

  • Becomes very anxious with any hint of perceived abandonment in a relationship.

Diagnoses

  • Dysthymic Disorder

  • Major Depressive Disorder, Recurrent

  • Borderline Personality Disorder

  • Personality Disorder NOS

  • Diagnosis Deferred

  • No Diagnosis

Definition of BPD

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a mental health disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of instability in mood, interpersonal relationships, self-image, and behavior. It is a common disorder affecting about 1-2% of the general population.

Individuals with BPD may experience intense and rapidly shifting emotions, have difficulty regulating their emotions and behaviors, and struggle with a sense of identity. They may also have a fear of abandonment, unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, and engage in impulsive and reckless behavior, such as substance abuse, self-harm, and suicidal behavior.

The causes of BPD are not fully understood, but it is thought to be a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors. Treatment for BPD typically involves a combination of psychotherapy, medication, and support from family and loved ones. With appropriate treatment, many individuals with BPD can improve their symptoms and lead fulfilling lives.

Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder 

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is characterized by a persistent pattern of instability in mood, interpersonal relationships, self-image, and behavior. Some of the common symptoms of BPD include:

1. Intense and rapidly shifting emotions, such as anger, anxiety, and depression.

2. Extreme fear of abandonment or rejection, which can lead to frantic efforts to avoid real or perceived abandonment.

3. Unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, characterized by idealization and devaluation of others.

4. Impulsive and self-destructive behavior, such as substance abuse, binge eating, reckless driving, and self-harm.

5. Recurrent suicidal thoughts, threats, or behavior.

6. Chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom.

7. Unstable and distorted self-image or sense of identity.

8. Paranoia or dissociation in response to stress.

It is important to note that not everyone with BPD experiences all of these symptoms, and symptoms can vary in severity over time. A qualified mental health professional can diagnose BPD based on a comprehensive assessment of an individual's symptoms and history.

Relationship between Borderline Personality Disorder & Trauma 

Research suggests that there may be a link between Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and trauma, particularly in childhood. Trauma refers to experiences that are emotionally and psychologically distressing, such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, neglect, or other adverse childhood experiences.

Experiencing trauma in childhood can disrupt the development of a child's brain and nervous system, leading to changes in their ability to regulate emotions and behaviors. This can increase the risk of developing BPD and other mental health disorders later in life.

While trauma does not cause BPD in all cases, studies have found that a significant number of individuals with BPD have a history of trauma. Research also suggests that the severity of BPD symptoms may be related to the severity of trauma experienced.

It is important to note that not all individuals who experience trauma develop BPD, and not all individuals with BPD have a history of trauma. Other factors, such as genetics, environmental factors, and personality traits, also play a role in the development of BPD.

Treatment Strategies for Borderline Personality Disorder

Treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) typically involves a combination of psychotherapy, medication, and support from family and loved ones. Here are some commonly used treatment strategies for BPD:

1. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT): DBT is a type of psychotherapy that focuses on helping individuals with BPD to develop skills for managing intense emotions, improving relationships, and reducing impulsive behaviors.

2. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): CBT is a type of psychotherapy that focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to BPD symptoms.

3. Medications: Antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotic medications may be used to treat specific symptoms of BPD, such as depression, anxiety, and impulsivity.

4. Mindfulness-based therapies: Mindfulness-based therapies, such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), can help individuals with BPD to become more aware of their thoughts and emotions, and to learn to regulate them more effectively.

5. Supportive therapies: Supportive therapies, such as group therapy or family therapy, can provide individuals with BPD with social support and help them to develop healthier relationships.

It is important to note that treatment for BPD can be complex and often requires a team-based approach involving mental health professionals, medical providers, and family members. Treatment may also involve ongoing support and maintenance to help individuals manage symptoms over the long-term.

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